More Confusing Marks on Blue Decorated PotteryBy

More Confusing Marks on Blue Decorated Pottery

More new marks on blue transferware can be found on the market. The new mark in Fig. 2 is the only one of the three shown that is a direct copy of a known original company, T. Rathbone Newfield Pottery, Tunstall, England. We couldn't find any old counterparts to the new marks in Figs. 5 and 6.

Although Staffordshire County, England has been a center of pottery making since the 18th century, the word "Staffordshire" was rarely included in company names before the second quarter of the 20th century. Staffordshire is a geographic area, not a specific company. "Staffordshire" does, however, appear frequently in company names used as marks on reproductions.

Genuine old marks are much more likely to include one of the six principle pottery-making cities of Staffordshire county which include Tunstall, Burslem, Stoke-on-Trent, Fenton, Hanley and Longton. Any mark that includes the word "Staffordshire" in the company name should be examined very carefully.

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Fig. 1

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Fig. 2

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Fig. 3

Figs. 1-3 Fig. 1 is a new flow-blue styled pitcher with gold trim. One of a graduated set of four pitchers, 6″ to 12″ tall. Decorated with Art Nouveau styled flowers. New pieces have mark shown in Fig. 2 in blue. New mark apparently based on a genuine old mark shown in Fig. 3 of T. Rathbone, Newfield Pottery, Tunstall, England, ca. 1898-1923. The mark shown dates from about 1912. Rathbone made a number of patterns in Flow Blue including Siam, Burmese, Clive, Norah, Japan, Trentham, Princess. The pattern on the new pitcher is a close, but not exact, match for the original Trentham pattern.

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Fig. 4 New doll-sized Flow Blue teapot, part of a tea set including cups, saucers, sugar and creamer. Mark in Fig. 5 on bottom.

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Fig. 5 New mark on Fig. 4. No old counterpart known. Mark has been seen in two colors: one gold, the other blue.

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Fig. 6 This new mark found on a pitcher and bowl. Black transfer. No exact match found; vaguely similar to many vintage marks using a crown.